DeeEmm

Pragmatism in code

Waxing lyrical about life the universe and everything software related since lunchtime 2006.

UEX Ultraedit For Linux

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It's a very exciting time in the DeeEmm office, we have been made part of the beta team for UEX - yes, that's right - UEX - the Linux version of Ultraedit - the long awaited port of Ultraedit to the Linux platform.The new Ultraedit for Linux is nearing the release date and a few lucky users have been chosen as beta testers - We were lucky to be one of those.

First impressions of UEX are exactly as expected. UEX is very similar visually to UEDIT and UEStudio. It differs in that there are a few features that are missing or different, but it likely that these will appear with the final release.We've been using Ubuntu 9.04 to run the UEX beta on, and we've been using it for the current re-write / tidying of the DMCMS version 1 release. So far our findings with UEX are pretty much as expected with a beta release, mostly the code works as expected, but with the occasional bug / hangup. Hopefully our dilligence with reporting the errors will mean that RC1 will as robust we have all come to expect Ultraedit to be, and that the final release of UEX is not too far behind it.

There are also rumors of a mac port of UEX, although there is no timeline currently available for it. My guess is that once UEX is up and running it will be little matter to port it to the mac platform.

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A Good Time To Try Linux

With the New release of Ubuntu just around the corner and the bloated and expensive Vista requiring a hardware upgrade for most current 2000 / XP users to even be able to install it on thier machines it has never been a better time to try Linux. With the ability to be able to boot off of the disc and try Ubuntu without even having to install anything on your hard drive there is really no excuse - especially as it is free!

5 months and still smilingIt has now been about 5 months that I've been solely using Ubuntu Linux as both my work and 'play' operating systems which means it's being used about 10-12 hours a day. So far I have only had to revert to using Windoze on one or two occasions - and that was only to use an excel file that I had written a bunch of VB code for as open office does not seem to support it. Eventually I will get around to re-writing the file in Javascript as a standalone software package - then my ties with Windoze will be completely gone.For emergency use I had set up Windows XP as a virtual machine (as well as leaving the Vista installation as dual boot when I initially installed Linux) The vitual machine allowed me to use the Excel file for a client demo, and as the virtual machine integrates quite nicely within the Linux window handling I'll leave it installed (see THIS video I recorded whilst writing this article). The dual boot Vista on the other had has not been booted into since I installed Linux on the machine - when I get some spare time I'll look into removing it.Another item of note is that I have managed to function using Linux in a solely windows envoironment - everyone else (with the exception of one Mac user) uses Windows at work, the main server is running Windows SBS, most of our clients use Windows. Even considering that I am probably the only person using Linux file sharing and editing of shared files has not caused any problems - Email from the SBS 2003 server has not been a problem - even acessing and creating public exchange folders is possible. Despite all the success, there are a few things to look out for - occasionally Evolution (the mail client I use) goofs out, Incorrect formatting within office documents seems to get very exaggerated within open office and you will probably need to manually set up some things that you take for granted on windows (such as being able to connect to the internet via bluetooth on my WM6 Smartphone) - Mind you, one point of note is that Ubuntu is a LOT more stable - as well as simply working with my Asus laptop from day 1, it has never suffered one lock up - I cannot say the same for my experience with any windows operating system.

 

So,why not replace your MCE machine with Linux too?

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Eclipse PDT And Xdebug (Better Than Ultraedit?)

Unusually I have found myself with a spare half hour this morning so decided to put it to good use and write a post here. Progress has been slow of late - the only thing that has really changed is the folder layout - I've created a few new folders and moved some files from the site root - the only real use this serves is simply to tidy things up a little. There's basically two new folders - 'javascript' and 'core_files' - both of these should be self explainatary. For those of you who are interested - checkout the latest CVS - you will see a branch called 'new_folder_layout' under the dmcms_080 module - that's the new site layout.Other worthy things of note are my continued useage of eclipse - some of you may recall that late last year I switched to Linux from Windoze (Ubuntu to be exact) the transition was relatively painless but it did leave me without a linux version of my trusty Ultraedit. Rumors of a Linux port aside it looked like UEdit Studio was not going to find its way over to the dark side and so that left me with little choice than to try something else - that something else was Eclipse with the PDT plugin (which I have installed by using the Pulse Eclipse manager).For the odd file edits here and there I must admit I use the built in text editor (Gedit) which has syntax highlighting and generally suits me fine but for project based stuff (like DMCMS) I've been using Eclipse. The integrated CVS client is great - there's not even any need for a key - just put in your password once and the checkout / update process is seamless and uninterrupted. Checking out into a project is very easy - in fact a project can be created when you check the files out if you require. Overall - very easy to use. My only (very small) complaint is that the CVS commands are hidden under a second level in the context menu (Under the 'Team' menu to be precise).With an active project you might want to set up the Xdebug integrated (free) php debugger - to do so you will need to select Xdebug as the default debugger from the properties menu (accessible under windows > properties) and add in the path to your php executable. A point worthy of note here is that you may not have a php executable if you installed PHP from the repository - you might need to add the command line interface version of PHP - you can easily do this by the following command-(for ubuntu)sudo apt-get install php5-cli

Obviously replace the php5 with your version - now you should be able to find php5 under Usr/Bin (type 'find php5' in a terminal to list all occurances of php5).

The Xdebug debugger http://xdebug.org/ is an open source project that is now bundled into Eclipse, it is free and thus very obviously a fraction of the price of the Zend version. For those of you who have a license for the Zend product - Eclipse also offers support for this too

With the Xdebug debugger installed and the CVS client up and running I now have a tool of comparible use to Ultraedit Studio for PHP work -for me it's still a bit clunky but then that's probably more to do with the fact that I've been using ultraedit for many years - I'm sure I'l eventually get used to it.

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Linux Programming Editors

A week or so in and I am really digging my Ubuntu installation, so much so that I'm almost regretting spending the cash on the new laptop - Installing Ubuntu on my old Dell Latitude has speeded it up end - it's now a much more useable machine. So far I have only had one issue with the Ubuntu installation - I've not yet been able to get WEP authentication working on wireless - the wireless card connects to non-secured networks no problem - but doesn't connect to WEP secured networks. Anyways - it's not a major issue and I'm sure I will sort it out in time.

EDIT: I reconfigured my router to use WEP Open Authentication and now it works!

I've decided to transfer over my web development onto the Ubuntu machine - I figure that if I can manage to comfortably use ubuntu to write code then I will junk my copy of Windoze Vista on the new laptop and make the jump over to linux permanent. The few programs that I need to run in windows can be run inside of VXWorks.My biggest issue is finding a replacement of Ultraedit - I've been using Ultraedit (Studio) for about the past 7 years and have found it hard to move away from using it, it simply has too many usefull features that many other editors do not. In the past I have tried many different open source editors for the Windoze platform but none quite hit the mark (I use Notepad++ on my work machine as they are too tight to cough up for a copy of Ultraedit). Linux appears to be no different.The main 'advanced' features I use for editing are syntax highlighting, function lists, bracket matching, project management, cvs integration, column editing, find / replace in files and php syntax checking.

I mainly use Uedit Studio for my web development - PHP / HTML / CSS, however it does get used for more specialist programming endeavours such as robot programming and so things like compiler integration is very handy.

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